Check out what's new in the Thinking Meat Bookstore!
Feb 122013
 

People around the world are celebrating the anniversary of Charles Darwin’s birth on February 12, 1809. (Maybe you can find a Darwin Day event near you.) To mark the day, I thought I’d share this quote from The Descent of Man, which has particular resonance for me because it seems related to what I’ve been reading in Steven Pinker’s The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined.

As man advances in civilization, and small tribes are united into larger communities, the simplest reason would tell each individual that he ought to extend his social instincts and sympathies to all the members of the same nation, though personally unknown to him. This point being once reached, there is only an artificial barrier to prevent his sympathies extending to the men of all nations and races. If, indeed, such men are separated from him by great differences in appearance or habits, experience unfortunately shews us how long it is, before we look at them as our fellow-creatures. Sympathy beyond the confines of man, that is, humanity to the lower animals, seems to be one of the latest moral acquisitions. It is apparently unfelt by savages, except towards their pets. How little the old Romans knew of it is shewn by their abhorrent gladiatorial exhibitions. The very idea of humanity, as far as I could observe, was new to most of the Gauchos of the Pampas. This virtue, one of the noblest with which man is endowed, seems to arise incidentally from our sympathies becoming more tender and more widely diffused, until they are extended to all sentient beings. As soon as this virtue is honoured and practised by some few men, it spreads through instruction and example to the young, and eventually becomes incorporated in public opinion.

The Descent of Man, Chapter III: Comparison Of The Mental Powers Of Man And The Lower Animals

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.